Posts Tagged ‘aging’

Top Five Things You Need to Know when Choosing Boca Raton Home Care Services

by: John Aker | December 16th, 2017

boca raton home careMany older adults wish to age in place in the comfort of home; however, when assistance is needed, shopping for in-home care can be a bit overwhelming. Knowing what type of care your loved one needs and what to look for in a Boca Raton home care agency will produce a more informed decision for your loved one’s care. The following are the top five things you need to know when shopping for Florida home care services.

  1. Is there a difference between home care and home health care? Yes. Home care is often referred to as private duty care or private pay services, (sometimes also called personal care or companion care) as these services are paid for by the individual receiving care, whether out of pocket from personal savings or from insurance or reimbursement from a Veterans’ program. Home care services are mostly “non-medical” services and can range from companionship to housekeeping, transportation, personal care, dementia care to 24-hour or respite care. Home health care always has a “skilled nursing care” component and involves certain other health care services one receives in a home setting for the treatment of a condition, illness or injury. The care is based on that condition, illness or injury getting better with the care being provided. Thus, home care also covers those situations where the care is ongoing and the condition or illness is chronic and does not improve over time.
  2. Is my loved one eligible for Florida home care? Anyone is eligible for home care services for which one privately pays a fee. Eligibility does come into play, however, if you are looking for help paying for care from any source other than private funds. Elder law attorneys and estate planners can be very helpful when planning for the payment of long-term care. Most states have Area Agencies on Aging that also provide help understanding eligibility for community based services.
  3. What about Medicare? It is a common misconception that Medicare will pay for long-term care needs, when in fact the opposite is true. Medicare is health insurance coverage provided by the United States government for people over age 65 that covers skilled medical care; it does not customarily cover assistance with daily living activities such as bathing, dressing and grooming. Some benefits may be available for short-term home health care, but only if certain conditions are met.
  4. How can I pay for home care? There are multiple ways to fund in-home care, including retirement savings such as pensions and life insurance policies or long-term care insurance. Some states offer a home care allowance through their Department of Social Services, and there may be other organizations within your state that offer assistance. Talk to a financial advisor and a home care agency to come up with a solid plan for affording care.
  5. Should I hire an independent caregiver from the newspaper or a friend’s referral or go with a professional Boca Raton home care agency? It’s your choice; however, nurse registries and private hires come with some hidden risks. When working with registries or hiring a caregiver on your own, the responsibility of managing and supervising the worker falls on the patient, a family member, or a family advisor. Government mandated taxes and workers’ compensation coverage usually fall on the consumer and oftentimes the workers are not trained. Full service home care agencies provide care by employees of the agency who are screened, trained, monitored and usually bonded and insured. There is far more safety in this model, and far less potential liability for the care recipient than with a nurse registry or private hire.

Shopping for home care services in Florida can be overwhelming, but it’s important to ask questions and understand the choices in order to make the best care decision for your loved one. If you are beginning the process of searching for home health care in Boca Raton for yourself or a loved one, contact Aker Kasten Home Health Care. We’d love to tell you about our home care services and can also give you a list of recommended questions to ask when interviewing other home health care agencies.

Snacks Can Be Delicious & Healthy

by: John Aker | September 10th, 2013

September is Healthy Aging Month!

What are you doing to age in a healthy manner?  Exercising?  Eating healthy foods in the right portions?  Taking your medications and vitamins as prescribed?  Enjoying some social time with family or friends by phone or in person?

All these simple things can help you age in a healthier way.  When we neglect any of the items above, we risk our good health and energy.  Since we can’t avoid aging, we should do what we can to remain healthy and vital. healthy snack post

Recently, one of our dedicated in home caregivers posted a picture of a BEAUTIFUL and DELICIOUS and HEALHTY snack she had prepared for her client.  We are so thrilled that she had taken the time to not only prepare a healthy snack option, but to make it appealing to the eye as well.  Often when we think of eating healthy, we conjure up a picture of something unattractive or unappetizing.  Caregiver Fahaina had prepared low-fat greek yogurt with fresh berries to encourage her client to enjoy a healthy snack.  It was simple, healthful, pleasing to the eye, and enjoyed with enthusiasm!

Eating right can taste great too!  And snacking between small meals is often recommended since it helps you eat less at mealtimes.  When you make healthy snack choices like Caregiver Fahaina presented, you can be proud AND enjoy great tasting food.  Thank you, Fahaina for the reminder that presentation can make good food so much more inviting!

Here’s a simple and delicious healthy soup option for you.  Ask you caregiver to help you prepare this soup and invite a friend over for a simple salad and soup meal.  Enjoy sharing some old stories and create new memories with a little social time around a healthy meal.  Bon appetit!

Quick and Healthy Potato Soup

2 cups Stock or reduced sodium broth

1 1/4 lbs White Potatoes, peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces

2 stalks Celery, chopped

1 medium Onion, choppedpotato soup

1 small Carrot, peeled and chopped

1 cup fat-free Half & Half or Milk

1/2 tsp Thyme or Italian Seasoning

Sea salt or garlic salt to taste

Pepper to taste

 

Bring broth to a boil in a large saucepan.  Chop vegetables while broth is heating, then add to saucepan.  Return to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, for 20 minutes.  Let cool slightly, then puree until smooth, or until soup is desired consistency.  Stir in remaining ingredients and cook for 5 minutes more.

Approximate cost per serving: $2.00

Nutritional Analysis per serving:  Calories  340, Fat 8g, Saturated Fat 4g, Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 40mg, Sodium 590 mg, Potassium 209 mg, Carbohydrates 42g, Fiber 4g, Sugar 8g, Protein 22g, Vitamin A 60%, Vitamin C 90%, Calcium 50%, Iron 10%.

SOURCE:  www.healthyagingfood.com

 

The content of this page is meant to educate, but it should not be used as a substitute for personal medical advice. The reader should consult his or her physician or clinician for specific information concerning specific medical conditions. While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that all information presented is accurate, as research and development in the medical field is ongoing, it is possible that new findings may supersede some data presented.

 

Heart Health

by: John Aker | April 3rd, 2013

Did you know that today is National Walking DayAK_ServiceArea

Did you know that physical inactivity doubles the risk of heart disease?

The American Heart Association has many tips and tools to help you discover the importance of physical activity.  One of the best things about walking as exercise is that walking is free, can be done anywhere (even walking in your home or marching in place in front of the TV during commercial breaks!) and can significantly improve your overall well-being.

Statistics show that 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women are at risk for heart disease.  And research indicates that poor lifestyle is a major contributor.  But don’t be discouraged–you can help reduce your risk right now by getting active and eating healthy.

Visit MyHeartMyLife.org for more information, tips, recipes, and even lists of walking clubs!  If they don’t have one near you–ask your caregiver to join your walking club!!

 

The content of this page is meant to educate, but it should not be used as a substitute for personal medical advice. The reader should consult his or her physician or clinician for specific information concerning specific medical conditions. While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that all information presented is accurate, as research and development in the medical field is ongoing, it is possible that new findings may supersede some data presented.

 

 

 

Medicare Changes for 2013

by: John Aker | January 3rd, 2013

With all the news coverage of the changed in legislation surrounding Affordable Care Act(also commonly referred to as ObamaCare), it can be difficult to know what really affects YOU.

The National Council on Aging has put together a few highlights of changes in Medicare in 2013. In addition, they also have posted some helpful links to items such as new preventative care options (such as a smoking cessation program) as well as Medicare’s chart of the monthly payments due in 2013.

There are some positive changes to look forward to including: an easier-to-read benefit summary…discounts to combat the prescription coverage gap…and decreased cost for mental health benefits. Unfortunately, 2013 will also deliver slightly higher premiums. For more details, visit What’s New with Medicare in 2013.

And be sure to join our online community today — we digest medical and healthcare news and information for you to bring you items of interest to you! We will also try to answer your questions so check our Facebook page or Twitter feed often for more current home care and health news items — ask questions and share your opinions. We care about what matters to you!

Avoid Re-Admittance After A Procedure or Hospitalization

by: John Aker | December 11th, 2012

According to research recently conducted at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, patients who received assistance with medication compliance in their home following a procedure or hospitalization reduced their risk of re-admittance to 11% as compared to 34% of those who received no supportive in-home care.

This is just another study affirming the value of home health care and its vital role within a continuum of care which seeks to provide support medical providers such as physicians and hospitals. The goal is to keep you healthy and happy–AT HOME!

Home health care helps you follow doctor’s recommendations, take your medication properly, enjoy nutritionally balanced meals, reduce your risk of falls, and meet reasonable exercise goals–all while assisting with activities of daily living and encouraging your social engagement.

The leading causes of admittance or re-admittance to hospitals and other facilities are medication mismanagement, falls, and failure to make or attend follow up appointments with physicians. Having The Aker Kasten Home Health Care Family on your side will help minimize or eliminate these risks.

And our whole agency is dedicated to you as a whole person. When we introduce your in home caregiver–you actually have a team of professionals working for you behind the scenes.

Your care team will include:

  1. Primary Caregiver
  2. Respite/Back-up Coordinator
  3. Care Manager
  4. Nurse Supervisor
  5. Chaplain (upon request)

And this team is available to you at no additional cost! Each member of your care team has specific skills and sensitivities to ensure unparalleled service and care of your physical, social, and emotional well-being.

Call now for details on how we can help you remain healthy and happy in your own home!

561-955-6010

Don’t Take a Holiday from Exercise

by: John Aker | December 2nd, 2011

Courtesy of the Private Duty Home Duty Association

Exercise is an important part of life, particularly for senior clients. It’s a known mood and energy booster, great for the heart, and it helps control certain diseases and ailments, like diabetes. While most people are busy preparing for the approaching holiday, don’t take a holiday from maintaining fitness.

From candy to cake to rich stuffingAK_ServiceArea and gravies, it’s the season for indulgence. It’s also the season in which many people are prone to depression. Exercise can help combat holiday weight gain while generating mood-lifting endorphins that can keep clients from feeling the holiday blues. The following tips can ensure that clients stay active and fit during this busy time of year:

  • Encourage group fitness classes. When people exercise with others, they are more likely to feel encouraged and continue their fitness routine than when exercising alone. Find a list of group senior fitness classes in your area, and encourage clients to attend. Ask Aker Kasten Home Health Care Agency about area classes that cater to seniors at hospitals, rehabilitation centers, or local community centers or gyms, and offer transportation services when needed. In group classes, such as simple water or step aerobics, clients can get in a good workout and socialize at the same time.
  • Follow trends for fitness and fun with video gaming systems. Many video gaming systems now offer games that focus on getting users moving. The Nintendo Wii and the Xbox Kinect are two systems that have become trendy tools in nursing homes and assisted living facilities across the country to help seniors stay mobile and increase coordination while having a little fun in the process. Maybe it’s time to invest in a game system and some exercise games, and challenge your caregiver to some fun and fitness. If you loved to bowl or play tennis in your prime, you can still enjoy the competition and movement of the online version without as much strain on your joints.
  • Enlist the family. With family and friends gathering together this time of year, create an exercise routine that the whole family can enjoy. From walking pets to competitive balancing exercises, ask your Aker Kasten Home Health Care Agency caregiver to help you create a list of fun activities that all ages can participate in.

As always, check with your physician before implementing any new exercise routine.

 

The content of this page is meant to educate, but it should not be used as a substitute for personal medical advice. The reader should consult his or her physician or clinician for specific information concerning specific medical conditions. While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that all information presented is accurate, as research and development in the medical field is ongoing, it is possible that new findings may supersede some data presented.

8 Foods That Will Boost Immunity

by: John Aker | October 31st, 2011

By Lucy Danziger and the staff at SELF

One sure sign that winter is on its way: Drugstores are already advertising for flu shots, and in fact, some started weeks ago! If you haven’t gotten your vaccine yet, there’s still plenty of time, but do schedule one: It reduces your risk for infection by as much as 90 percent, says Anne Moscona, M.D., professor of microbiology and immunology at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. And while you’re at it, try working some of these delicious immune-boosting foods into your daily diet to fight cold-weather bugs naturally and from the inside out. Cold and flu? Not you!

Brussels Sprouts

These fall and winter vegetables contain vitamin A, which helps keep your immune system healthy. Plus, they offer a phy-tonutrient that can help clear away carcinogenic substances in the body, says Keri Gans, R.D., spokeswoman in New York City for the ADA.

Mushrooms

Enjoying white-button mushrooms may strengthen your body’s defenses against the common cold and even cancer. A report in The Journal of Nutrition shows that mushrooms enhanced the activity of immune system cells. Slice them into your next stir-fry, or order extra ’shrooms on your next pizza delivery call!

Goat Cheese

Besides going great on crackers, goat cheese is a good source of copper, which keeps your immune system humming. Swap out mayo and smear goat cheese on a wrap or mix with chopped nuts and dried fruit for a filling toast topper.

Broccoli and Kale

A compound in this fall and winter produce may enhance your immune system, an animal study in The Journal of Nutri-tional Biochemistry shows. Chewing the veggies triggers the release of chemicals, possibly helping your body regulate infection-fighting white blood cells. Cooking reduces the dose, so it’s best to eat them raw.

Cherries

These bite-size fruits are rich in anthocyanins, which can jump-start your immune system and mop up free radicals. Even if they are out of season you can buy cherries dried, frozen or canned year-round.

Yogurt

Healthy people who had a drink with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (also found in Stonyfield Farms yogurt) daily for 12 weeks called in sick for respiratory or stomach problems 60 percent fewer times than those who didn’t consume it, notes the journal Environmental Health. Spoon up some plain yogurt, or blend it with frozen berries, sliced banana, peanut butter, a drizzle of honey and ice for a sweet and savory smoothie.

Tomatoes

Relax with tomatoes’ vitamin C, which blunts the effects of stress by reducing free radicals and bolstering your immune system. “It is also your body’s first line of defense against stressors like colds and exertion,” explains Paul Lachance, Ph.D., professor emeritus of nutrition and food science at Rutgers University.

So, if you need help adding some of these healthy choices to your diet, call Aker Kasten Home Health Care Agency today and ask for one of our Caregivers to assist you with grocery shopping and health meal preparation!

561-955-6010 or 561-737-4990

 

 

The content of this page is meant to educate, but it should not be used as a substitute for personal medical advice. The reader should consult his or her physician or clinician for specific information concerning specific medical conditions. While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that all information presented is accurate, as research and development in the medical field is ongoing, it is possible that new findings may supersede some data presented.

Vaccination Recommendations

by: John Aker | July 22nd, 2011

Vaccination Recommendations for Older People by Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D.

Jul 22, 2011 As seen on Yahoo! Health

Flu: Influenza (flu) vaccine

Many older people think they don’t need to worry about something as insignificant as the flu. But an annual vaccination against influenza virus is recommended each fall or winter for adults of all ages. Although earlier studies probably overestimated the dangers of influenza in the elderly, bouts of the flu can produce severe symptoms, may require hospitalization, and can be fatal. Influenza is also recognized to increase the risk of heart attacks. One problem is that the flu vaccine is less effective in older individuals. Nonetheless, the vaccine offers at least some protection for most older individuals and should be obtained each year.

Pneumonia: pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Pneumovax 23)

Another common and potentially dangerous illness is pneumonia. There are about four million cases of pneumonia each year in the U.S., and the pneumococcus is the most common agent leading to hospitalization for pneumonia in people of all ages. Influenza infection greatly increases the risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia. The pneumonia may be mild and easily treated, but some develop an overwhelming infection that can be fatal.

This vaccine can protect against pneumonia that is caused by the 23 types of the pneumococcus bacterium that are responsible for the vast majority of pneumococcal pneumonia. However, it offers no protection against pneumonia caused by the other 60 or more types of pneumococcus, or by other bacteria or viruses. Recommendations: the vaccine should be given one time to all people who are 65 or older with no prior pnumococcal vaccination or when the history of vaccination is unknown. The vaccine should also be given for those 65 or older if it’s been five years since a previous vaccination. The vaccine is also recommended for some who are younger than 65, for example those with liver disease, diabetes, or chronic heart or lung diseases.

Shingles: Herpes zoster (Zostavax)

Shingles results from activation of the varicella virus that causes chicken pox and then remains dormant for many years. Shingles can attack any of the 95 percent of adult Americans who have had chicken pox. As a result, between 10 and 20 percent of them will develop shingles during their lifetime. Most often shingles begins with an unexplained throbbing or burning pain in a limited area on one side of the chest or lower back. Days to weeks later a painful rash appears and evolves into pus-filled blisters with the same band-like distribution as the pain. The rash is not contagious, but bacteria may infect the blisters.

Recommendation: because the incidence of shingles increases progressively with age, the vaccine in recommended for everyone 60 years of age or older. The zoster vaccine (Zostavax) is given as a single, one-time injection, regardless of a previous history of herpes zoster (shingles) or chicken pox.

Contraindications to giving these vaccines

A vaccine should not be given to an individual who has had a prior severe reaction to the vaccine or at a time when he or she is suffering from a moderate to severe acute illness.

Other possible vaccines

A booster injection against tetanus is recommended every 10 years. Some older people may wish to get protection against hepatitis A and/or B, especially if they will be travelling to underdeveloped countries or are exposed to people with a high likelihood of these disorders.

Check with your doctor about your need for all of these vaccines. We will even accompany you to your doctor’s office to help you understand the information they provide. Call Aker Kasten Home Health Care today at 561-955-6010 or 561-737-4990.

 

The content of this Aker Kasten Home Health Care Agency News page is meant to educate, but it should not be used as a substitute for personal medical advice. The reader should consult his or her physician or clinician for specific information concerning specific medical conditions. While all reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that all information presented is accurate, as research and development in the medical field is ongoing, it is possible that new findings may supersede some data presented.